Isis Rodriguez’ early artwork focused on labor activism and the empowerment of women, using the cartoon to de-mystify the sex industry.

EARLY ARTWORK

 ISIS RODRÍGUEZ

GLYPHTOONS 2000-2006

La Única
La Única

The self reliant exotic dancer embracing the reality of transitioning into the future. Colored ink and colored pencil on paper 196 x 335 cm.

Learning to Fly
Learning to Fly

After an exotic dancer quits, she has to re-invent herself. Acrylic on paper 127 x 127 cm

Playboy Webspinners
Playboy Webspinners

A modern version of the Playboy bunny divided into dual personalitis of a 21st century exotic dancer Acrylic on paper 137 x 267 cm

Miss Lady Luck
Miss Lady Luck

Exotic dancing is a gamble: dancers can make nothing, or they can make a fortune. Acrylic on paper 244 x 122 cm

What She Consumed
What She Consumed

Exotic dancers become trapped in a culture of consumption and predation. Colored Pencil and Ink on Paper 145 x 97 cm SOLD

Doña Cien Besitos de la Noche
Doña Cien Besitos de la Noche

Exotic dancers can embody a whole range of strong female sexualities, from proud to predatory. Acrylic, ink, and pencil on paper 203 x 131 cm

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"No matter what you do in this world, your body is still a temple."

Isis Rodriguez

Isis uses cartoons as symbols to paint an intimate mythology based on her personal experiences with exotic dancers.  

MY LIFE AS A COMIC STRIPPER 1997

He Said I Could
He Said I Could

A satirical cartoon of an exotic dancer squeezing money out of a customer. Acrylic and India ink on bristol 36 x 41 cm

Be All That You Can Be
Be All That You Can Be

Satirical army ad spoof showing a woman soldier with rifle defending multiple female identities. Acrylic gouache and India ink on bristol 58 x 38 cm SOLD

Freedom
Freedom

What is sacred to an exotic dancer? How does she protect her integrity? No matter what you do in this life, your body is still a temple. Acrylic gouache and India ink on bristol 51 x 33 cm

No More
No More

Be careful what you wish for because that ain’t no pussy between her legs! Acrylic gouache and India ink on bristol 31 x 25 cm

She's Got Legs
She's Got Legs

A satirical cartoon of an exotic dancer with a scorpion vagina and ZZ Top lyrics. Acrylic gouache and India ink on bristol 33 x 36 cm SOLD

Peepshow Gone Creepshow
Peepshow Gone Creepshow

Exotic dancers have to compromise their integrity to meet the demands of strip clubs. Acrylic on bristol 71 x 76 cm

Never Again
Never Again

It’s a triumphant feeling when an exotic dancer leaves the industry. Acrylic gouache and India ink on bristol 43 x 36 cm SOLD

Miss World
Miss World

Exotic dancers can feel like they’re on top of world, but sometimes they get broken, too. Acrylic on wood 31 x 23 cm SOLD

Evolution
Evolution

Sometimes a dancer will become so competitive that she will evolve into a money mongering monkey. Acrylic gouache and India ink on bristol 31 x 72 cm

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"Exotic dancing is not a moral issue. It's a labor issue."

Isis Rodriguez

Isis' controversial solo show "My Life as a Comic Stripper" debuted in 1997 at the Galería de la Raza, earning her praise, threats, and a critique in Judy Chicago and Edward Lucie Smith’s Women and Art: Contested Territory.  Her early work focused on labor activism. Using the cartoon to de-mystify the sex industry, her works are satirical commentary on the rewards and consequences of exotic dancers in San Francisco’s entertainment district. Is it freedom of expression or exploitation?